Sue-And-Settle NPE Patent Litigation Tactics May Violate USPTO Ethics Rules

Michael E. McCabe, Jr.Litigation Ethics, Office of Enrollment and Discipline, Patent Ethics, Patent Litigation Ethics, USPTO Ethics Investigation3 Comments

Non-practicing entities who engage in a pattern of filing numerous lawsuits without any intention of testing the merits, solely to extract low ball settlements, should take note that the USPTO’s Office of Enrollment and Discipline (OED) takes a keen interest in such conduct.  A recent “exceptional case” decision in a patent case from federal court in California should give pause … Read More

This Post Could Save Your Patent Law License

Michael E. McCabe, Jr.OED, Office of Enrollment and Discipline, Patent Ethics, USPTO Administrative Suspension0 Comments

Some patent attorneys and agents are under the impression that once they have passed the Patent Bar exam and have earned a PTO registration number, they are essentially registered for life, with no further action required on their part.  If you are one of those people, then you should read on. One of the jobs of the USPTO’s Office of … Read More

Litigators Beware: Bad News Can Trigger USPTO Ethics Investigation

Michael E. McCabe, Jr.IP Litigation Sanctions, Office of Enrollment and Discipline, Patent Ethics, Patent Litigation Ethics0 Comments

Bad news sells.  As the author Douglas Adams observed, “Nothing travels faster than the speed of light with the possible exception of bad news, which obeys its own special laws.” Take IP litigation, for example.  The mainstream IP media regularly reports on both allegations and court decisions regarding issues relating to attorney conduct–or alleged misconduct.  Some of the more common … Read More

You Just Received An OED Bar Grievance. Now What?

Michael E. McCabe, Jr.OED, Office of Enrollment and Discipline, Patent Ethics0 Comments

The only time a patent attorney or agent ever wants to hear from the USPTO’s Office of Enrollment and Discipline is when they are admitted to the Patent Bar and issued a registration number. Other than that, no news is good news. So if an envelope arrives from the OED (certified mail, return receipt requested), don’t expect the Office to … Read More

USPTO Reciprocal Discipline Case Illustrates Flaw In Rules

Michael E. McCabe, Jr.Continuing Legal Education, Gross Misconduct, Moral turpitide, Office of Enrollment and Discipline, Reciprocal Discipline, USPTO Director Decisions0 Comments

A recent disciplinary decision published by the USPTO Director illustrates a serious flaw in the Office’s rules governing reciprocal discipline.  In re Sanjeev Kumar Dhand, D2016-17 (USPTO Dir. Nov. 16, 2016). California Discipline The factual background of the Dhand case is eerily similar to our post from yesterday (link here).   This matter involves California-based patent attorney Sanjeev Kumar Dhand. Mr. … Read More

USPTO Disbars Siemens’ Outside Patent Atty For $2.5M Billing Fraud

Michael E. McCabe, Jr.Consent Resignation, Criminal Conviction, OED, Office of Enrollment and Discipline, Patent Ethics0 Comments

Each year, a number of patent and trademark practitioners agree to exclusion from the USPTO rather than face an OED ethics investigation or USPTO disciplinary action.  While not always the case, such consent exclusions usually involve very serious–and often criminal–practitioner misconduct. One such matter is the case of former patent attorney David N. Caracappa.  See In re David N. Caracappa, Proc. … Read More

When The Cover-Up Outweighs The Crime: Professional Discipline For Hiding Attorney Errors

Michael E. McCabe, Jr.Competence, IP Ethics, Office of Enrollment and Discipline1 Comment

“As long as the world is turning and spinning, we’re gonna be dizzy and we’re gonna make mistakes” — Mel Brooks In bar disciplinary proceedings, the word “mistake” is often used either to explain, describe, or defend against, a charge of alleged unethical behavior. But is it unethical for an attorney to make an “honest mistake”?  Ethical guidance on what seems … Read More