TM Lawyer’s Attack on Constitutionality of OED Investigation Dismissed–For Now

Michael E. McCabe, Jr.IP Ethics, OED, Office of Enrollment and Discipline, USPTO Ethics Investigation, USPTO OED2 Comments

A federal district judge has dismissed a trademark lawyer’s complaint alleging that the USPTO’s Office of Enrollment and Discipline’s (“OED’s) investigation of him violated his rights under the Fourth and Fifth Amendments of the U.S. Constitution.  The Court held that dismissal of his federal complaint was appropriate because the matters raised in the complaint are currently being adjudicated by the … Read More

Excluded Patent Attorney Appeals To Federal Circuit

Michael E. McCabe, Jr.Client Funds, District Court Litigation, Office of Enrollment and Discipline, Petition to E.D. Va.Leave a Comment

A patent attorney who was excluded from the USPTO has appealed to the Federal Circuit. By way of background, on July 15, 2015, the USPTO Director entered an order excluding Richard Polidi from practice before the Office.  The USPTO Director’s disciplinary action came after the Director of the Office of Enrollment and Discipline (OED) filed a complaint for reciprocal discipline … Read More

IP Attorney Challenging Constitutionality Of USPTO OED’s “Abusive” Ethics Investigation

Michael E. McCabe, Jr.OED, Office of Enrollment and Discipline, USPTO Ethics Investigation, USPTO OED1 Comment

An IP attorney has filed a lawsuit against the United States Patent and Trademark Office seeking to prohibit the Agency’s Office of Enrollment and Discipline (OED) from continuing to investigate him for alleged ethics violations because the process employed in conducting the ethics investigation is abusive and violates due process. The complaint, which was filed on January 6, 2016 by … Read More

Is OED’s Indefinite Delay In “Reviewing” Reinstatement Applications Constitutional?

Michael E. McCabe, Jr.Office of Enrollment and Discipline, Patent Attorney Disciplinary Matters, Reinstatement, SuspensionLeave a Comment

An attorney’s suspension from the practice of law is not unlike a jail sentence.  Not literally, of course.  The suspended attorney is free to do anything they otherwise could do when they were not suspended, with the exception of practicing law. Many practitioners believe that once their suspension period has run its course, the practitioner is “released,” the suspension is automatically lifted, and the practitioner may immediately get back into … Read More